/page/2

Having a look at horror movie trailers trying to decide if I should watch one. Sitting alone at home, between trailors, something upstairs just fell. It made a loud wooden thud of a noise. I should probably go check that…

Not moving….. I should… but I am not… shoooould…. noooot…

Tapestry of “The Battle of Animals” circa 1723, France.

Ashmolean, Oxford, England. 

Ashmolean, Oxford, England

Ashmolean, Oxford, England. Free entry and so much to see. 

jennifertcoen:

Once upon a time in late 2008 doctors discovered a thing in my head that shouldn’t be there. The French doctors called it a cyst while the Irish doctors called it a tumour (I was studying in France but am a citizen of Ireland so I had to go back and forth for consultations) either way, it was a bitch of a thing.

The mystery lump turned out to be totally benign but it was badly infected and causing pretty major issues like not being able to walk straight, randomly falling over and the occasional loss of the use of the left side of my face which is never a good sign. So it was time to get that lump gone! 

Above are photos of: Scans from December 2008, many, many, many drugs, surgery in January 2009, art from the recovery period (which included many, many, many more drugs) and a shot of today.

Today, Monday the 17th of June 2013, was my final scan. I had a follow up surgery in 2010 but the photos are pretty repetitive. I’ll always need check ups in future but today was the end of this particular lump and it has been a strange few years. 

I have lost friends because I was busy suffering in silence which is my fault. There was no reason for me to shut out the people I did but I did it anyway because I only wanted to speak to my Mum. Mum was the only person in my family who knew how scary cancer was and it killed her when I was 16. I watched it kill her in October 2003. For the entire month of November 2008 the doctors thought I had a brain tumour and we discussed my options in a worst case scenario. Cancer. Chemo. Radiation. I never shared this information with my family or friends and I didn’t have my Mum to tell. So I just stopped talking really.

People don’t change for no reason. As far as my family and friends knew I was fun, happy and outgoing and then I was a little bit sick and then I was someone else. I’ve let that “someone else” take over and I’ve ruined 5 years of my own life in doing so. It wasn’t the tumour’s fault, it was mine. 

Today wasn’t just my last scan, today I said goodbye to “someone else”. So if you’ll excuse me, I have several emails to send and a few phone calls to make. I’m going to get me back to being me and hopefully get a friend or two back in the process. 

Never keep silent about your problems. Your mental health can change your life just as drastically as disease or disability. 

Good vibes to you for taking the time to read this. Now go laugh at something stupid or hug someone lovely. Life is too short not to be happy.

Update! I now have a hearing aid to help with the damage the lump did to my ear. New and improved and quality of life is better than ever. Surrounded by good people and slowly rebuilding bridges. Happy days!

Pitt Rivers Museum

My favourite museums

1: Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford, England

Why? Because this gorgeous space located just behind the Natural History Museum in Oxford (both of which are free of charge!) not only holds a wonderful collection of anthropological items for Oxford University but is itself one big anthropological wonder! 

"The museum’s collection is arranged thematically, according to how the objects were used, rather than according to their age or origin. This layout owes a lot to the theories of Pitt Rivers himself, who intended for his collection to show progression in design and evolution in human culture from the simple to the complex. Whilst this evolutionary approach to material culture is no longer fashionable in archaeology and anthropology, the museum has retained the original organisation of the displays. The display of many examples of a particular type of tool or artifact, showing historical and regional variations, is an unusual and distinct feature of this museum." Wikipedia

http://www.prm.ox.ac.uk/index.html

2: Museé du Quai Branly, Paris, France

Why? Because the Quai Branly museum houses a vast collection of indigenous art and antiquities from Africa, Asia, Oceana and the Americas with such care and artistic consideration. There is exquisite attention to detail in the layout of the museum, the manicured gardens and the display of individual items. The architecture of the museum allows for some of the larger items in the collection (including entire totem poles and ships) to be observed in large enough spaces to do them justice without the museum itself seeming vacuous. 

http://www.quaibranly.fr/en/

3: The British Museum, London, England

Why? Because it is THE British Museum, no trip to London is complete without a visit here. Whether you want to go to scowl at your own ancestry strung up for display by those big bullies who ran the empire or you want to go to appreciate the wonderful conservation efforts of those big bullies who ran the empire you will not be disappointed. The legacy that empire left and the incredible collections it bequeathed to this museum are now in the care of some really remarkable people whose tireless efforts have made the British Museum an international educational  institution. With a packed calendar of special exhibitions ranging from all things Shakespearean to erotic Japanese woodblock printing to remarkable artefacts from Pompei (to name just three exhibitions from the last two years) the British Museum never fails to impress. 

https://www.britishmuseum.org/

4: Electric Lady Land, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Why? Because if you need a quick pick me up (and you will) after visiting the Anne Frank House (http://www.annefrank.org/en/Museum/) just pop over to Electric Lady Land. In April 1987 Nick Padalino and Michele Delage opened their home as an art gallery and museum like none other. Electric Lady Land is “the first museum of fluorescent art” which contains a strange, varied and beautiful collection of fluorescent objects and artworks. Historical items include stamps and (ever so slightly radioactive) children’s chemistry sets, geological specimens go through an array of lightwaves during your guided tour which turns a cabinet of rocks into a kaleidoscope of all things marvellous in the world and art includes (not just Nick and Michele’s whole gallery upstairs) a tribute painting to Jimi Hendrix lovingly painted by his own brother and an interactive fluorescent art installation by Nick. Go. Just go. Maybe hit a coffee shop first, then go. You’re welcome!

http://www.electric-lady-land.com/index.html

girljanitor:

bashi-bazouk:


peppercyanide:


sisterwolf:



via



I never even
c
wow
How did they get away with that
AH
I LOVE THIS


What do you mean how did they get away with it?
History isn’t one straight line progressing towards a liberal society.
Look how much Americans attitudes have changed between 1980 and today. 1980 was the first time most very religious people voted, they abstained before that at the behest of their churches. Now they dictate policy at every election.
In my family photo album there are pictures from the 20s of a woman called ‘uncle bob’. She dressed in men’s clothing, and had a ‘companion’. This was a rough industrial town, they were working class, nobody cared. It was her business.
This is why politics is important - the moment you think everything is better today than it was in the past, you let other people take control of the direction society goes in - with you sitting back presuming we’re going forwards.


reblogging for the commentary

I want a time machine so I can throw myself at Uncle Bob.

girljanitor:

bashi-bazouk:

peppercyanide:

sisterwolf:

via

I never even

c

wow

How did they get away with that

AH

I LOVE THIS

What do you mean how did they get away with it?

History isn’t one straight line progressing towards a liberal society.

Look how much Americans attitudes have changed between 1980 and today. 1980 was the first time most very religious people voted, they abstained before that at the behest of their churches. Now they dictate policy at every election.

In my family photo album there are pictures from the 20s of a woman called ‘uncle bob’. She dressed in men’s clothing, and had a ‘companion’. This was a rough industrial town, they were working class, nobody cared. It was her business.

This is why politics is important - the moment you think everything is better today than it was in the past, you let other people take control of the direction society goes in - with you sitting back presuming we’re going forwards.

reblogging for the commentary

I want a time machine so I can throw myself at Uncle Bob.

(via pornography-and-logarithms)

Drag queen's homophobia speech goes viral

lavellington:

Why is this not getting more attention on tumblr? Smackdown to the homophobes.

jetwolf

Having a look at horror movie trailers trying to decide if I should watch one. Sitting alone at home, between trailors, something upstairs just fell. It made a loud wooden thud of a noise. I should probably go check that…

Not moving….. I should… but I am not… shoooould…. noooot…

Tapestry of “The Battle of Animals” circa 1723, France.

Ashmolean, Oxford, England. 

Ashmolean, Oxford, England

Ashmolean, Oxford, England. Free entry and so much to see. 

jennifertcoen:

Once upon a time in late 2008 doctors discovered a thing in my head that shouldn’t be there. The French doctors called it a cyst while the Irish doctors called it a tumour (I was studying in France but am a citizen of Ireland so I had to go back and forth for consultations) either way, it was a bitch of a thing.

The mystery lump turned out to be totally benign but it was badly infected and causing pretty major issues like not being able to walk straight, randomly falling over and the occasional loss of the use of the left side of my face which is never a good sign. So it was time to get that lump gone! 

Above are photos of: Scans from December 2008, many, many, many drugs, surgery in January 2009, art from the recovery period (which included many, many, many more drugs) and a shot of today.

Today, Monday the 17th of June 2013, was my final scan. I had a follow up surgery in 2010 but the photos are pretty repetitive. I’ll always need check ups in future but today was the end of this particular lump and it has been a strange few years. 

I have lost friends because I was busy suffering in silence which is my fault. There was no reason for me to shut out the people I did but I did it anyway because I only wanted to speak to my Mum. Mum was the only person in my family who knew how scary cancer was and it killed her when I was 16. I watched it kill her in October 2003. For the entire month of November 2008 the doctors thought I had a brain tumour and we discussed my options in a worst case scenario. Cancer. Chemo. Radiation. I never shared this information with my family or friends and I didn’t have my Mum to tell. So I just stopped talking really.

People don’t change for no reason. As far as my family and friends knew I was fun, happy and outgoing and then I was a little bit sick and then I was someone else. I’ve let that “someone else” take over and I’ve ruined 5 years of my own life in doing so. It wasn’t the tumour’s fault, it was mine. 

Today wasn’t just my last scan, today I said goodbye to “someone else”. So if you’ll excuse me, I have several emails to send and a few phone calls to make. I’m going to get me back to being me and hopefully get a friend or two back in the process. 

Never keep silent about your problems. Your mental health can change your life just as drastically as disease or disability. 

Good vibes to you for taking the time to read this. Now go laugh at something stupid or hug someone lovely. Life is too short not to be happy.

Update! I now have a hearing aid to help with the damage the lump did to my ear. New and improved and quality of life is better than ever. Surrounded by good people and slowly rebuilding bridges. Happy days!

Pitt Rivers Museum

My favourite museums

1: Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford, England

Why? Because this gorgeous space located just behind the Natural History Museum in Oxford (both of which are free of charge!) not only holds a wonderful collection of anthropological items for Oxford University but is itself one big anthropological wonder! 

"The museum’s collection is arranged thematically, according to how the objects were used, rather than according to their age or origin. This layout owes a lot to the theories of Pitt Rivers himself, who intended for his collection to show progression in design and evolution in human culture from the simple to the complex. Whilst this evolutionary approach to material culture is no longer fashionable in archaeology and anthropology, the museum has retained the original organisation of the displays. The display of many examples of a particular type of tool or artifact, showing historical and regional variations, is an unusual and distinct feature of this museum." Wikipedia

http://www.prm.ox.ac.uk/index.html

2: Museé du Quai Branly, Paris, France

Why? Because the Quai Branly museum houses a vast collection of indigenous art and antiquities from Africa, Asia, Oceana and the Americas with such care and artistic consideration. There is exquisite attention to detail in the layout of the museum, the manicured gardens and the display of individual items. The architecture of the museum allows for some of the larger items in the collection (including entire totem poles and ships) to be observed in large enough spaces to do them justice without the museum itself seeming vacuous. 

http://www.quaibranly.fr/en/

3: The British Museum, London, England

Why? Because it is THE British Museum, no trip to London is complete without a visit here. Whether you want to go to scowl at your own ancestry strung up for display by those big bullies who ran the empire or you want to go to appreciate the wonderful conservation efforts of those big bullies who ran the empire you will not be disappointed. The legacy that empire left and the incredible collections it bequeathed to this museum are now in the care of some really remarkable people whose tireless efforts have made the British Museum an international educational  institution. With a packed calendar of special exhibitions ranging from all things Shakespearean to erotic Japanese woodblock printing to remarkable artefacts from Pompei (to name just three exhibitions from the last two years) the British Museum never fails to impress. 

https://www.britishmuseum.org/

4: Electric Lady Land, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Why? Because if you need a quick pick me up (and you will) after visiting the Anne Frank House (http://www.annefrank.org/en/Museum/) just pop over to Electric Lady Land. In April 1987 Nick Padalino and Michele Delage opened their home as an art gallery and museum like none other. Electric Lady Land is “the first museum of fluorescent art” which contains a strange, varied and beautiful collection of fluorescent objects and artworks. Historical items include stamps and (ever so slightly radioactive) children’s chemistry sets, geological specimens go through an array of lightwaves during your guided tour which turns a cabinet of rocks into a kaleidoscope of all things marvellous in the world and art includes (not just Nick and Michele’s whole gallery upstairs) a tribute painting to Jimi Hendrix lovingly painted by his own brother and an interactive fluorescent art installation by Nick. Go. Just go. Maybe hit a coffee shop first, then go. You’re welcome!

http://www.electric-lady-land.com/index.html

girljanitor:

bashi-bazouk:


peppercyanide:


sisterwolf:



via



I never even
c
wow
How did they get away with that
AH
I LOVE THIS


What do you mean how did they get away with it?
History isn’t one straight line progressing towards a liberal society.
Look how much Americans attitudes have changed between 1980 and today. 1980 was the first time most very religious people voted, they abstained before that at the behest of their churches. Now they dictate policy at every election.
In my family photo album there are pictures from the 20s of a woman called ‘uncle bob’. She dressed in men’s clothing, and had a ‘companion’. This was a rough industrial town, they were working class, nobody cared. It was her business.
This is why politics is important - the moment you think everything is better today than it was in the past, you let other people take control of the direction society goes in - with you sitting back presuming we’re going forwards.


reblogging for the commentary

I want a time machine so I can throw myself at Uncle Bob.

girljanitor:

bashi-bazouk:

peppercyanide:

sisterwolf:

via

I never even

c

wow

How did they get away with that

AH

I LOVE THIS

What do you mean how did they get away with it?

History isn’t one straight line progressing towards a liberal society.

Look how much Americans attitudes have changed between 1980 and today. 1980 was the first time most very religious people voted, they abstained before that at the behest of their churches. Now they dictate policy at every election.

In my family photo album there are pictures from the 20s of a woman called ‘uncle bob’. She dressed in men’s clothing, and had a ‘companion’. This was a rough industrial town, they were working class, nobody cared. It was her business.

This is why politics is important - the moment you think everything is better today than it was in the past, you let other people take control of the direction society goes in - with you sitting back presuming we’re going forwards.

reblogging for the commentary

I want a time machine so I can throw myself at Uncle Bob.

(via pornography-and-logarithms)

Drag queen's homophobia speech goes viral

lavellington:

Why is this not getting more attention on tumblr? Smackdown to the homophobes.

My favourite museums

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and always paddle your own canoe

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